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MORTISE & TENON
Intro
Mortising Setup
Mortising Safety
Mortising Speeds
Mortising

Mortise & Tenon
Click the following for a printer friendly
version of Tip - Pg. 1-3,
Pg. 4-5

Mortising

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Figure 8-5. All of the following joints can be made by working with mortising bits and chisels: (A) through, (B) keyed, (C) haunched, (D) blind, (E) loose wedged, (F) three-way, (G) twin, (H) notched, (I) open-faced, (J) concealed haunched, (K) through wedged. Click on image to see larger view.

All the joints shown in Figure 8-5 can be made using the mortising accessory.

Position the workpiece on the table and depress the chisel to do the cutting. Use only enough pressure to keep the bit cutting (Figure 8-6). Pressure required will vary with the size of the chisel and the hardness of the wood. Softwoods such as pine cut easily, while hardwoods such as maple require considerably more pressure. If you can't make the cut without exertion, it is probably because the edges on the bit and/or the chisel are dull.

 

 

 

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Figure 8-6. Work with the correct speed and use only enough feed pressure to keep the bit cutting. Mortising cuts need a heavier feed than simple drilling, but if you must really lean on the feed lever, check the chisel and bit for sharpness.

The rip fence/worktable V-block arrangement can be used to hold round workpieces. Be sure to mark the workpiece so the cuts will begin and end on the same line (Figure 8-7).

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Figure 8-7. The fence/table V-block arrangement can be used to hold round workpieces for mortising. Be sure to mark the workpiece so the cuts will begin and end on the same line.

 

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Figure 8-8. Two factors that may spoil a mortise: (A) Chisel tends to lead off twoard the cavity already formed, and (B) workpiece tends to drift away form the chisel as the cut is being made. Click on image to see larger view.

Two factors which tend to spoil a mortise are illustrated in Figure 8-8. To eliminate these, cuts should be made as shown in the order given in the second detail of the drawing. The general rule is: Always make the end cuts first. Start with 1/4 n deep cuts, never less than threequarters of the full width of the chisel. This may not be possible on the last cut, but keep as close to it as you can. Repeat until desired depth is achieved.

Avoid narrow shoulders. The chisel will drift away, leaving a tapered side. Many workpieces split because tenons are forced into mortises with slopping sides. If necessary, use a smaller chisel.

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